The Skye Terrier Club

Skye Terrier Club Judging Lists

A reminder that it is that time of year again when updated Judging CV’s should be submitted to the Skye Terrier Club’s Judge’s Sub-Committee for consideration.

Please can you send them to:

Cath Parker
20 Dewhurst Street
Colne
Lancashire
BB8 8AU

Or email  to treasurer@skyeterrierclub.org.uk.

These should be submitted by 8 November to enable the revised list to be issued promptly in the New Year.

Skye Terrier Club Calendar 2015

Skye Terrier Trail Calendar 2015

Follow the Skye Terrier Trail through 2015 with the Skye Terrier Club’s new calendar. Each month highlights a place of interest that features Skye Terriers from the annuls of history.

The venues in the calendar have given permission to feature but there are other places out there that we are awaiting permission from. We therefore hope to expand the Skye Terrier Trail with a leaflet featuring all of the Trail highlights at a later date.

Calendars are priced at £7 + postage and packaging. P&P is charged at three rates: UK for those living within the United Kingdom; EU for those living in Europe, and; International (Int) for those living outside of the EU. Please use the buttons below to select your calendar and postage rate – all payments are handled by PayPal for security and peace of mind.

 

Skye Trail UK Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skye Trail Europe Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skye Trail International Calendar

 

 

 

The Skye Terrier's Homecoming Statue

Royal Reception for Island Terriers

Skye Terriers from around the UK gathered for the unveiling
Skye Terriers from around the UK gathered for the unveiling

The largest gathering of Skye Terriers for many years met at Armadale Castle on the Isle of Skye on Thursday 24th July to witness the unveiling of a statue to this very rare breed by HRH The Princess Royal.

Aptly named ‘The Homecoming’ the unveiling of the statue of two life size Skye Terriers was witnessed by over 40 Skye Terriers and their owners, who had travelled from all over the UK and as far away as the USA to join in the celebration of the breed in its native homeland.

They were also able to see a new display on the Skye Terrier at the Museum of the Isles in the grounds of Armadale Castle.

The Skye Terrier is Britain’s most endangered native breed of dog*. To raise awareness and promote greater understanding of the breed the Skye Terrier Club have spent the last two years raising money for a permanent statue to be created.

The life-size bronze statue of a ‘prick-ear’ and a ‘drop-ear’ Skye Terrier has been sculpted by the renowned, Wiltshire based artist, Georgie Welch and cast by Pangolin Editions, Europe’s leading sculpture foundry. It now stands at a view point looking towards visitors as they walk down a footpath overlooking the water and is mounted on a granite base hewn from a local quarry on Skye and gifted to the Club. The plinth is low to allow visitors, in particular children, to touch and interact with the work.

L-R: Sculptress Georgie Welch, Skye Terrier Club Chairperson Jenny Kendrick, HRH The Princess Royal and Club Patron Christian Landolt
L-R: Sculptress Georgie Welch, Skye Terrier Club Chair Jenny Kendrick, HRH The Princess Royal and Club Patron Christian Landolt
Local schoolchildren produced drawings of Skyes that were on display during the unveiling
Local schoolchildren produced drawings of Skyes that were on display during the unveiling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commenting on the day, Jenny Kendrick, Chair of the Skye Terrier Club said “We are delighted and greatly honoured that the Princess was able to unveil the statue and took so much interest in the breed. The Skye Terrier is often called the ‘heavenly breed’ and they certainly brought heavenly weather with them. We would also like to thank Clan Donald for all their support and as the dogs are part of the island’s heritage we hope that ‘The Homecoming’ will give the thousands of visitors, from home and overseas, who visit Armadale Castle’s grounds and museum every year a greater knowledge and understanding of these intelligent, loving and loyal dogs”.

Scott Armstrong, VisitScotland Regional Director, added: “The addition of this beautiful Skye Terrier statue, appropriately named ‘The Homecoming’ in its homeland gives the thousands of visitors who flock to Armadale Castle each year the chance to learn more about these loyal dogs whilst taking in the beautiful surroundings of the castle, museum and grounds.

HRH The Princess Royal and Club patron Christian Landolt
HRH The Princess Royal and Club patron Christian Landolt

“Skye attracts thousands of visitors each year to take in its beautiful scenery, wildlife, history and culture and the addition of this unique sculpture at one of its star attractions can only add to the region’s appeal.”

For more information on The Skye Terrier Club, explore the pages of this website. For more stunning photos and stories of the day, please visit the Facebook page ‘Skye Terrier Club’.

*The Skye Terrier topped the Kennel Club list of endangered breeds in 2013. They estimate there are only 400 of the breed left in the UK and figures for the registration of puppies fell to a record low of just 17 puppies in 2013. The Kennel Club’s list of endangered native breeds monitors those whose numbers are below 300 puppy registrations each year, which is thought to be a suitable level to sustain a population. An ‘at watch’ list monitors those between 300 and 450 registrations per annum that could be at risk if their numbers continue to fall.

Letsplay

The Right Puppy for You

Sourcing a puppy can be an exciting time – you’ve met many dogs at events around the country, explored many breeds and decided that a Skye is the one for you. But the work does not end there, now you have to find a breeder and you may have to wait for that breeder to have a litter. The Skye Terrier Club recommend finding a responsible breeder, but what does that mean?

What Do Responsible Breeders Do?

The Kennel Club recommends that a breeding contract be in place between owners of breeding bitches and dogs to ensure that there are no misunderstandings regarding obligations. They also recommend that breeders produce a Buyer’s Contract when rehoming their puppies.

A Responsible breeder is one who puts the health and welfare of their dogs and puppies before anything else. They may be members of the Skye Terrier Club, and they may be members of the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder’s Scheme. They will also have committed themselves to a certain standard of care that strives towards producing healthy, happy puppies that maintain a healthy gene pool.

Members of the Skye Terrier Club will see that:

  • The dam (mother) has been properly raised and is at least 2 years old before she is bred from
  • Prior to breeding the dam will have been DNA swabbed and will have a general health check to ensure she is in good health (all members are encouraged to have ultrasound scans of the kidneys done prior to breeding – please see our Health Pages for more information on this breed health scheme)

Once the decision to breed has been made a responsible breeder will then go on to select a mate. This will take into consideration a wide variety of factors including conformation, temperament and genetic diversity. The breeder will research the potential mate and its lineage for signs of any health concerns and will compare the pedigrees of the dam and potential mate. The breeder will ensure that sire (father) has also had the required health checks and that he is also in good health.

Conformation is not a question of beauty but of ensuring that the dog is physically capable to live a healthy life as a pet, working or show dog. A healthy dog is a well-made dog.

Over the past two decades Skye Terrier Club members and breeders have been involved in the importing of new lines into the UK. The importation of semen for artificial insemination and of puppies into the UK has widened the gene pool and imports of dogs and semen are continuing. As a result, the puppies being produced today are typically genetically diverse. More importantly, as the widening of the gene pool continues it will enable responsible breeders to continue to produce healthy puppies for many more generations.

Puppies Are On Their Way

Most Skye bitches whelp naturally without veterinary intervention but occasionally there are complications. A responsible breeder will make sure that a bitch in whelp receives any help she might need as soon as possible.

Once all health checks have been completed, pedigrees have been compared and the mating has taken place a responsible breeder will continue to protect the health and welfare of the pregnant dam. Her diet will be monitored to ensure she is receiving the best nutrition to support herself and her unborn puppies. Later in the pregnancy she may receive an ultrasound scan to give an indication of litter size. She will be provided with an adequate whelping (birthing) space and she will be monitored closely for signs of labour. During the whelp she will be monitored and veterinary intervention will be given if necessary.

FatherSonOnce the puppies have arrived, the dam will continue to receive the correct nutrition so that she can continue to make enough milk for her pups and support her own bodily needs. The puppies will also be monitored and handled daily, weighed and wormed regularly and once old enough they will be vet checked. A responsible breeder will also begin to socialise their puppies – they will introduce them to sights and sounds around the home, to other family animals and to visiting friends, and they will provide daily human contact. This is an incredibly important process that every puppy needs and deserves.

When Can I Take One Home? 

Once you have found a breeder you may find that you have to wait for them to have a litter. Once they have a litter you may be invited to view the puppies at 5/6 weeks old. This can be a wonderful experience as you should be able to see the entire litter, with their mother (and possibly their father too).

The breeder will ask you questions about your home life, your experience with dog ownership and training and what you hope to get out of owning a Skye. This is to help the breeder to match you up with the most suitable puppy.

The breeder may draw up a Buyer’s Contract, and may have a clause in this contract that makes it clear that they will take the puppy back if your circumstances change. Some things are beyond anyone’s control and responsible breeders will step in to help with the care or rehoming of one of their puppies, no matter how old the dog may be.

You should be able to see how the puppies interact with each other, with their mother, with their humans and with the visiting humans. This is your chance to ask the breeder more questions about how to continue the socialisation process and correctly care for your puppy, but please be prepared to answer the breeder’s questions too!

Puppies should remain with their littermates and mother for at least the first 8-9 weeks of their lives. This is because there is a sensitive period stretching from around 3 weeks old to around 9 weeks old in which puppies learn all manner of social behaviours that they need in order to be happy, well adjusted dogs. The best place they can learn these behaviours is with their mother and littermates. A responsible breeder may let you view puppies as early as 5 weeks but they will not separate the puppies from their mother until at least 8-9 weeks old.

Things to be Aware of

When you are searching for a puppy or considering having a puppy from a breeder, it might be useful to think about the following questions.

  • Is the breeder a member of the Skye Terrier Club, or the Assured Breeder Scheme? If they are, have they complied with the regulations of the scheme(s) they are involved in?
  • Is the breeder able to tell you about the parents and family lines, in detail? This includes health issues, temperament and achievements in the family.
  • Has the breeder performed the necessary vet checks on the parents prior to breeding and can they show records and certificates that confirm this?
  • Have you been able to see the puppies with their mother at the breeders’ premises? If the breeder is the owner of both mother and father, have you had the opportunity of meeting the father as well?
  • Is the litter registered with the Kennel Club? If it is registered, are there any endorsements placed upon the puppies? If there are endorsements, the breeder should explain what these mean to you. If the litter is not registered with the Kennel Club, has the breeder explained why?
  • Can the breeder provide details of the puppy’s diet, worming history and veterinary checks?
  • Has the breeder begun a program of socialisation with people, other animals, household sights and sounds and have they provided you with advice on how to continue this once you get the puppy home?ItwasntMe
  • Can the breeder offer you advice about caring for your puppy, about living with and training a Skye? If they have, do you feel confident that this support will be ongoing and that if you approached the breeder with a question or query they would help out as best they could?
  • Has the breeder asked you questions about your lifestyle, your reason for wanting a Skye and what you will hope and expect from your new puppy?

If you are interested in adding a Skye Terrier to your household then please contact the Skye Terrier Club. We will be able to put you in touch with breeders in your area who will be more than willing to talk to you, answer your questions and let you meet their dogs. Getting to know your breeder, and allowing them to get to know you, is the best and most effective way of ensuring that you get a healthy, happy puppy that is suitable for your personal circumstances.

Foundry Ready Clay Cast of Skye Terrier's Homecoming

Homecoming Announcement

The Skye Terrier Club is delighted to announce that Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal has kindly agreed to unveil The Homecoming Statue on 24th July 2014 at Armadale Castle, Clan Donald Skye.

Further details regarding the event will follow shortly. In the meantime, see Royal.gov.uk for the official announcement.

This will be a historic day for the Skye Terrier world and we very much hope you can come and join us at the event. If you are coming along please leave a comment or get in touch via our Facebook page so that we can ensure adequate arrangements are made for the event.

 

 

St Mary's Sholihull

Skye Club Open Show Report

Saturday 19th April saw Skyes from all over the country getting together for the Skye Terrier Club Open show in Solihull, West Midlands. The show was judged by Mrs C Burscough of the Kilfinan kennel. Mrs Burscough judged 20 dogs and 17 bitches on the day to find her winners –

Best Dog: Curtis’ Brakemill Barnum ShCM
Reserve Best Dog: Marshall’s Emoticon Ciaro Glorfindel (Imp)
Best Puppy Dog: Miller’s Feorlig Really Wicked

Best Bitch: Barracloughs’ Ch Such Skyeotts Amnesix High Skye Miracle at Wemoway (Imp)
Reserve Best Bitch: Barrass’ Lavaux Spirit of the Isle of Gallondean ShCM
Best Puppy Bitch: Miller’s Feorlig Romantica 

BIS and RBIS
BIS (left) and RBIS

After a difficult challenge, Best In Show went to the drop-ear bitch Barracloughs’ Ch SuCh Skyeotts Amnesix High Skye Miracle at Wemoway (Imp) and Reserve Best in Show to the dog, Curtis’ Brakemill Barnum ShCM. Best Puppy in Show went to the dog, Miller’s Feorlig Really Wicked and Best Opposite Sex Puppy to the bitch, Miller’s Feorlig Romantica.

Full results and further photos can be found at our Facebook page – Skye Terrier Club. Judges Critiques will be published on the website when they are available.

BPIS (right) and BOS Puppy
BPIS (right) and BOS Puppy

During the judging interval we ran our Junior Handling competition. Classes are run in two age groups, 6-11 and 11+ and we were delighted to welcome four young handlers to the competition at this show. Judged by Mr Ken Jessup the handlers were judged on their ability to handle their dogs on the table and on the floor, their handling techniques and proficiency in the ring. Competition was tough but Mr Jessup found his Best Junior Handler in Thomas Hasker.

Also during the interval, the Skye Terrier Club presented the first annual Versatility Awards. The My Skye Versatility Awards Scheme began in October 2013 as a way to recognise and reward the achievements of Skye Terriers outside the sphere of breed showing. Points are awarded for any activity that shows off the versatility of the Skye and raises awareness of the breed including agility competition, attending companion dog shows, achieving KC Good Citizen awards, visiting local schools to talk about the breed and attending Club organised events such as the Sponsored Walk Across Skye. We were thrilled to welcome several competing dogs in the first few months of the scheme and even more delighted to awards several rosettes at this year’s show. Our Versatile Skyes this year are:

  • Flossie and Hilda Stewart who achieved their Bronze Award.
  • Poppy and Linda Hasker who achieved their Silver Award.
  • Jinty and Margaret Samuel who achieved their Gold Award.
  • Freedom and Sarah Downes who achieved their Gold Award.
  • Luna and Josie Downes who achieved their Gold Award.
  • Mop and Thomas Hasker who achieved their Platinum Award.
  • Brodie and Cath Parker who achieved their Platinum Award.
  • Finlay and Hilda Steward who achieved their Platinum Award.
  • Donald and Margaret Samuel who achieved their Platinum Award.
Thomas and Linda Hasker with their Versatility and Junior Handling Awards
Thomas and Linda Hasker with their Versatility and Junior Handling Awards

Activities that our Versatility winners have done this year include attending school assemblies, being a Pets As Therapy dog and attending fun days and events for the PAT association, winning into Grade 3 Agility, attending several companion dog shows and winning Best In Show on several occasions, regularly manning the breed booth at Discover Dogs at Crufts and in London, achieving the Kennel Club Good Citizen’s Scheme Gold award and even appearing in the James Wellbeloved magazine to tell readers a bit more about what a Skye Terrier is like as a pet! A huge thanks goes out to our winners, and all the Skyes out there that are working hard to show how fun and adaptable Skye Terriers are – keep up the good work!

If you’re interested in competing in the My Skye Versatility Awards for 2014, please email us and we will send you a scorecard and further information about the scheme.

The Skye Terrier Club would like to warmly thank our judge, Mrs Burscough, and all the exhibitors for supporting the show. We would also like to thank Mr Jessup for judging the Junior Handling and all who helped to ensure the day ran smoothly and successfully.

Both of our breed shows are open to the public with fans and enthusiasts extremely welcome to pop in to meet and dogs. Our next show is our Championship show in September 2014, to be held in Lostock, Bolton. Further details and directions to the venue will be posted on our Club Shows page nearer the time. We hope to see you there!

Wax Mould

Homecoming Update

This brown stone will do nicely!
This brown stone will do nicely!

The Skye Terrier’s Homecoming Project is moving forward! At the end of March two of our members, Sula and Thor, took their humans to The Torrin Quarry, Isle of Skye to check out a suitable stone for the plinth of the statue. The upper and lower surfaces of the granite will be cut into level surfaces for the installation of the statue but the sides will be left in their organic state.

Our grateful thanks go to The Torrin Quarry for the gift of the stone.

Wax Mould
Wax Mould

On the statue front, the ‘wax’ stage of the sculpture in the making…mould complete and used to create the Skyes in wax, they are hollow and the wax has an even thickness of approximately 6mm. The base of the statue will bear an inscription – English on one side and Gaelic on the other. The Gaelic reads: ‘Bha gràdh is sealbh aig Comann nan Abhagan Sgitheanach orra’. If you want to know what the English inscription says, make sure to attend the unveiling on July 24th!

Wax BodyDon’t forget you can still own your own unique piece of Skye Terrier history we still have a limited number of maquettes of The Homecoming available for purchase. Visit the Skye Terrier’s Homecoming Facebook page for more information – send us a message to enquire about your personal piece of Skye Terrier history!

The Skye Terrier Club, its members and enthusiasts of the breed continue to raise money to fund this project. If you would like to help the project to completion you can do so by donating via Paypal, using the button below.




Skye in Full Coat

Grooming the Glamorous Skye

Many people meeting Skyes the first time assume that their beautiful coat takes a lot of work to keep. While it looks spectacular, the Skye coat is also hardy and functional and can be controlled perfectly with weekly brushing.

The Skye Terrier has a double coat comprised of a soft, downy undercoat and a longer, harder topcoat. They have shorter, slightly softer fringing on their ears and head forming a veil that does not limit their vision as the hair naturally falls into a centre parting. When in full coat the only part that is trimmed is the fur between the pads on the feet.

Essential grooming equipment for the Skye coat: a pin brush, a long-toothed comb, a pair of dog scissors (you can buy curved and round-ended versions so that accidents do not happen) and a pair of nail clippers.

Skye owner and dog groomer Julie explains how she keeps her male Skyes in full show coat:

Grooming the Skye
Stages of Grooming

“I have two cream Skye terriers in full show coat, and my trade is a dog groomer, so it comes easy for me to maintain them.

I bath them every week in an oatmeal shampoo and conditioner. I dry with a dryer and use a pin brush so not to split the jacket, then use a long pin comb to finish off, lifting the coat in sections so that any tangles can be dealt with.

Only trimming is underneath and around the feet and a light tidy around the bum area just for the hygiene purpose, this is done with curved scissors so no accidents happen by digging in.

If you want to keep a full coat then pinning the hair back helps to keep the hair out of the eyes, if you’re not showing then trimming the hair around the face will make things easier.

If your Skye terrier is just a pet then finding a good groomer to trim your dogs coat down will make less work, owning a Skye terrier doesn’t mean you have to keep a full coat.

Nails need trimming regularly either with nail clippers or dremmel, this needs to be introduced at a very early age as most dogs can take a dislike to this procedure.

Teeth is a very important job and needs doing every week and this also needs to be introduced early, just buy a medium tooth brush and play around the puppies mouth with the brush then progress to the teeth gently as teething can be painful, tropiclean gel is a good product this can be used on its own or placed on the tooth brush.

My dogs enjoy their walks over the moors and they do get muddy and wet, but a good coat will take all of this if looked after.”

Pin the fringe up when not showing
You can pin the fringe up when not showing

While a weekly grooming session can easily control the Skye coat and prevent tangles, for the pet Skye you may prefer to have the coat trimmed shorter. Pet Skye owner Sarah explains how her dogs are trimmed:

“I have two Skyes, a cream dog and a silver bitch, who go to the groomers twice a year – once at the beginning of Spring and once part way through Summer. Because they have different coat textures they have slightly different clips.

My cream dog has a very fine, woolly undercoat so the groomer takes him quite short. The ear fringes and beard are trimmed, and feathering is left on his tail but the veil on his head and his face fur are trimmed right back. My silver bitch has a similar cut but she keeps more of the veil on her head and face and she has short ‘boots’ left over her feet.

Between clips I brush them once a week to ensure the coat stays tangle free, and I trim their nails when required. I usually only have to trim their dew claws as the other ones tend to wear down when they’re out and about. I also trim the fur between their pads on their feet.”

Pet trims can save time and look adorable
Pet trims can save time – but don’t forget to brush the fringes and feathers to prevent tangles!

Just because Skyes are long coated, don’t think that they aren’t terriers by nature. They love nothing more than being out and about and getting…filthy. And because the coat is very robust it can cope with the elements and with bathing to clean them. Here are Florence and Oscar enjoying their walks on the beach and in the countryside. If you come along to one of the Skye Terrier Club shows you might even see Oscar and his coat in the show ring.

 

The Skye Terrier Club

Skye Terrier Breed Specific Seminar

The Skye Terrier Club would like to invite you to a Breed Specific Seminar. Current and aspiring judges can discover more details about the Kennel Club breed standard, and the correct conformation and movement of the Skye Terrier breed. Additionally, the afternoon session of the seminar will provide the opportunity to undertake a breed specific hands-on assessment and delegates will get the chance to go over a number of dogs.

Places for the assessment are strictly limited so please book early to avoid disappointment.

The Seminar will be held on:

SATURDAY 1 NOVEMBER 2014

10.00 – 4.00pm

THE VILLAGE HALL
OVER KELLET
CARNFORTH
LANCASHIRE
LA6 1DT

£20.00 including light lunch

Morning Session
BREED STANDARD
Mrs Moira Barrass (Gallondean)

Afternoon Session
Breed SPECIFIC HANDS ON Assessment
(limited places available –  please book early)

This event is now fully booked

Foundry Ready Clay Cast of Skye Terrier's Homecoming

Skye Terrier’s Homecoming Project

Quarter Size Maquette
Quarter Size Maquette

Skye Terrier Club members and enthusiasts of the breed from around the world have been working tirelessly throughout 2013 and 2014, raising money to fund a project called Skye Terrier’s Homecoming. A sponsored walk across the Isle of Skye was organised and completed by a number of Skye Terrier owners in May 2013, quizzes and competitions have been successfully run and there are currently a number of exciting activities still in the pipeline for 2014!

Foundry Ready Clay Cast of Skye Terrier's Homecoming
Foundry Ready Clay Cast of Skye Terrier’s Homecoming

The project will culminate in the production of an original, life size sculpture of two Skye Terriers, one prick and one drop ear, by talented sculptor Georgie Welch. As part of the production process, Georgie has produced quarter size maquettes that will be used to cast a limited number of sculptures available for pre-order through The Skye Terrier Club – proceeds will go towards the cost of the completed statue. To enquire about cost and availability please contact The Skye Terrier Club by email.

The completed statue will be situated within the historic grounds of Armadale Castle at Sleat on the Isle of Skye. The statue will be sculpted to show the charm of Skye Terriers and will installed in such a way that everyone, but in particular children, will be able to interact with, and enjoy the two dogs.

A small information area will also be created within the Clan Donald Museum of The Isles, which will inform visitors about the breed and its history. The centre piece of this display will be the 140 year old plaster model of Greyfriars Bobby that was the maquette for the famous statue in Edinburgh which commemorates John Gray’s faithful Skye terrier, Bobby.

Bobby was donated to the Club by an anonymous benefactor and he has been restored to his full glory by artist Georgie Welch. We are sure you will want to join us in thanking these two people for preserving Bobby for all to see and enjoy when they visit the glorious Isle of Skye. Visitors will be in no doubt that Greyfriars Bobby was indeed a Skye Terrier, and the most famous one of them all!

It is with great excitement that we can now announce the official date for the unveiling of this beautiful tribute to one of Scotland’s oldest terrier breeds.

The Homecoming will be officially unveiled on July 24th 2014 in the ground of Armadale Castle on the Isle of Skye. Skye terriers (and their humans) are cordially invited to attend this historic event in celebration of their heritage.

Stay tuned to The Skye Terrier Club for further details about the unveiling – coming soon!